Friday, September 19, 2014

Special Links to GoFundMe for Col. Potter!

Col. Potter rescues many dogs with serious medical needs, doing what we can to bring them back to health so they can have a brighter Forever.  Here are some of the CP Fosters currently requiring expensive treatments.  A small donation of $5 or $10 from many caring people will all add up to more healthy Cairns!
Harper
Heartworm Treatment

Kyler
Heartworm Treatment

Lovemuffin
Laser Treatment for Deep Spinal Wound

Simon Rubin Paddy
Surgery to Remove Cancerous Tumor

Skip
Surgery to Save his Vision
Sprout
Surgery to Repair Liver Shunt

Trudeau
Heartworm Treatment


There are many other ways to give to our Cairns, becoming a Foster Home or Transport Volunteer among them.  We welcome your donations to help these Rescued Cairns, and we hope you will consider becoming a Col. Potter Volunteer!


Col. Potter Needs a Few More Helping Hands!
Please Volunteer to Foster or Transport and help us Rescue every Cairn in need! 

Please  Consider being a CP Volunteer! 

CP Foster Home Application form: 
http://www.cairnrescue.com/rescue/foster.htm 

CP Transport Volunteer Driver form: 
http://cairnrescue.com/rescue/transport.htm 

CPCRN Volunteer form: 
http://cairnrescue.com/rescue/volunteer.htm 

Col. Potter’s Name a Rescue Cairn Program 
http://mall.cairnrescue.com/forms/frm_namecairn.htm











Friday's Funnies!

Off the Leash


Thursday, September 18, 2014

Reflections on Retractable Leads

Keep your dogs close for safety's sake

While "A Fish Called Wanda" has some great acting and very funny moments, the story subplot where the crook is trying to knock off the elderly witness but, instead, kills her three little dogs has always bothered me.  The appearance of the flexi-lead trumpets the advent of what you know is going to be the death of the final dog.  Yes, I know the dogs were not actually hurt, and I know it's just a movie.   I know it was all played out for comedic plot advancement, but that flexi-lead sound as she distractedly walks away has stuck in my head.  It isn't funny.

The truth is that when our dogs are too far from our side, and whenever we are distracted by something else, our dogs are at risk.

Nothing bad happens most of the time, so it is easy to poo-poo advice to the contrary, but it only takes one time to have a tragic, irreversible event happen.  We end up heartbroken, but the dog is the one who has paid the price.  

I use a flexi-lead for potty time, in my securely fenced back yard.  Period.  They never go out the front door.  Ever.  Yes, the dogs like them because they can move about more naturally as they do their business, but they do not comprehend the risks.  There are amazingly dangerous things that can happen if a squirrel jumps on the fence line, or a dog three yards over starts to bark, so I have to pay 100% attention and have my finger on the stop button - which is not always reliable.

Please, think about the real potential dangers before you clip on a flexi lead.

Consider using a good, secure harness and a sturdy five-foot lead whenever you are out and about with your Cairn.  Leave your cell phone in your pocket, and focus on your dog.  Walking with the best equipment, i.e., the most secure lead and harness, is a Great opportunity to do some relationship building with your Cairn, and it is your best bet to ensure that you and your dog will arrive home safely and in a happy mood.

This is played for laughs, but offers some important lessons

Here is an actual near-death accident caused by a flexi-lead and a distracted owner:



Before you get a Retractable Leash 
Cross posted from Columbia Animal Hospital October, 2013



Last week, one of our good clients found out first hand the danger of retractable leashes. She called about her little dog being attacked while on a walk. We made the appointment and found that except for some bruises and painful areas, her dog would be fine. The injury to our client was worse. You see, she had her dog on a retractable leash and when the attack happened, her dog was too far away from her to "reel" him in fast enough and she instinctively grabbed the cord with her hand. The rope quite effectively "sawed" through her finger, nearly down to the tendons.

We understand that retractable leashes are popular because "the pets love it" but for the most control and safety of our patients & clients we recommend a regular 6 foot nylon or leather leash. You will have more control because your pet is closer to you and if you have to grab the leash you will not have this kind of injury. Also, if necessary, you can put the loop of the leash on your wrist and have 2 hands free to assist you or your pet.

If you have a retractable leash for your pet, please reconsider when there is even the smallest chance that your pet may encounter danger and you need both hands available for rescue.


Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Wacky Wednesday!

Wednesday is the day to be WACKY! Each week we will showcase a terrierific cairn picture with an appropriate caption. If you have a terrierific cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture and caption for an upcoming "Wacky Wednesday" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com! All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or out reach purposes.

 A big shout out to Zander for being our Wacky Wednesday model this week!

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Tuesdays with Tabasco!

Contributed by CP Tabasco in LA

CP Tabasco Available for Adoption in LA

Want to play?!!!


Tabasco here – still waiting! 

Did you see the Aurora Borealis this week???  Me neither!  Well, I saw it on the news, but certainly not down here in LA!  Foster Mom said that I was all the brightness and color anyone needed, so I guess I don’t feel too bad.  You know, if you put in your application to adopt me, you wouldn’t have to look to the Northern skies anymore either to brighten up your life!

See!  I’ll put the link right here again to make it easy:


Can you Sit?

I can!  Especially if Foster Mom has a great Treat in her hand!  I can Sit, I can Down, I can Stand...  Anything you want!  Take a look and see what you think:



Check Out my Intake Story:

Check Out my 1st Tuesdays with Tabasco:

Check Out my Matilda’s Journey Story:





Sunday, September 14, 2014

Sunday Sweets!

Sunday is full of SWEETS!  Each week we will showcase the sweeter side of Cairns.  If you have a sweet filled Cairn and would like us to consider YOUR picture for an upcoming "Sunday Sweets!" send it to us at cpcrnblog@gmail.com (All photo submissions become the property of CPCRN and may be used for fundraising, promotion and/or outreach purposes.).


Sweet Sonny Boy
Foster ShaSha
Dougie
Ty after ACL Surgery - Feel Better Soon!
Baby D and Sophie
Finian, Brodie, and Nessie fka CP Barter
Foster Baby Jake
Foster Keeva
LB
WaterSpirits
Sweet Miss Divinity
Fife







Friday, September 12, 2014

Col. Potter Special Links to GoFundMe!

Col. Potter rescues many dogs with serious medical needs, doing what we can to bring them back to health so they can have a brighter Forever.  Here are some of the CP Fosters currently requiring expensive treatments.  A small donation of $5 or $10 from many caring people will all add up to more healthy Cairns!
 
Harper
Heartworm Treatment

Kyler
Heartworm Treatment

Laurier
Heartworm Treatment
Lovemuffin
Laser Treatment for Deep Spinal Wound

Simon Rubin Paddy
Surgery to Remove Cancerous Tumor

Skip
Surgery to Save his Vision
Sprout
Surgery to Repair Liver Shunt

Trudeau
Heartworm Treatment


There are many other ways to give to our Cairns, becoming a Foster Home or Transport Volunteer among them.  We welcome your donations to help these Rescued Cairns, and we hope you will consider becoming a Col. Potter Volunteer!


Col. Potter Needs a Few More Helping Hands!
Please Volunteer to Foster or Transport and help us Rescue every Cairn in need! 

Please  Consider being a CP Volunteer! 

CP Foster Home Application form: 
http://www.cairnrescue.com/rescue/foster.htm 

CP Transport Volunteer Driver form: 
http://cairnrescue.com/rescue/transport.htm 

CPCRN Volunteer form: 
http://cairnrescue.com/rescue/volunteer.htm 

Col. Potter’s Name a Rescue Cairn Program 
http://mall.cairnrescue.com/forms/frm_namecairn.htm











Friday's Funnies!

Off the Leash

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Tips to Help Your Dog Overcome Fear

“…Your patience and willingness to work through tiny steps will in and of itself take pressure off the dog and speed the process.  Slower is literally faster when it comes to this type of work with your dog…

Foster Mom is helping Kyler slowly learn to overcome his fears
Dogs can develop fear of any person, place or thing.  Considering that the same thing happens in humans, this isn't surprising.  Dogs inherit their temperaments from the dogs who make up the family tree.  A confident mom and dad don't guarantee confident offspring, though, since dogs further back in the bloodline may have planted genetic surprises that hide for a generation or even a few generations. 

Physical health plays a major role in dog temperament, too.  Unable to explain that something hurts, a dog will try to avoid that painful situation.  Some dogs do this by moving away if they are free to do so, but these dogs as well as the more assertive types may react aggressively to ward off something they know from experience is going to hurt.  With any fearful or aggressive dog behavior, medical issues are the first thing to consider. 

Once a dog has begun to react with fear, correcting the original trigger of the behavior is not always enough to change the dog's habit of reacting that way.   The earlier you intervene, the better your chances of relieving the fear.  Recovery is faster when you start rehabilitating the fear sooner.  In fact, if you work through it immediately after the scary event happens, you may be able to alleviate the fear in just one session.  In such a case you're dealing with a first impression rather than an established fear.

Don't count on this quick fix, though.  Be prepared to continue helping the dog at a pace comfortable over the long haul for as long as it takes.  Your patience and willingness to work through tiny steps will in and of itself take pressure off the dog and speed the process.  Slower is literally faster when it comes to this type of work with your dog.

Understanding and Prevention 

Puppies who have the right early life experiences have the best chance of developing confident personalities that cope well with life and have the ability to bounce back from stresses.  The temperament the puppy inherits from its ancestors will always be a limiting factor on just how healthy the personality can be.  But the right handling will make the most of whatever strengths are there, and help to limit the problems from the dog's inherent temperament weaknesses.  Providing a puppy with the right early experiences is more complicated than it seems.  Puppies can stoically endure events in their lives, apparently be fine, and then show serious fear reactions from those events as their defense drives emerge with maturity. 

Yet keeping a puppy protected from any potential fear or stress doesn't work, either.  Part of growing up to become confident is learning that scary things can have happy endings.  Another part is learning that you can overcome something scary.  On the other hand, puppies can get carried away in the enjoyment of overcoming and become aggressors.

Puppies who have too little stress in early life can grow up lacking the ability to handle stress.  Puppies who have no frustrations can grow up unable to cope with frustration, and unable to take "no" for an answer.  This can happen to pups who grow up in one-puppy litters with no littermates to compete with, and to pups removed from the mother dog prior to about 7 weeks of age.  Knowing as much as possible about the dog’s early life experience will help you understand why you are seeing fearful behavior now.

Vacuum Cleaners and other Loud Noises 

Vacuum cleaners make weird noises.  Their use involves a person thrusting the thing around the room in gestures that wouldn't make any sense to a dog.  The concept of cleaning a floor, other than by eating any food spilled on it, would also be foreign to a dog's way of thinking.  There's not much about a vacuum cleaner for a dog to like!  The occasional herding dog will chase it because it moves, and some dogs will "attack" or threaten it because it isn't acting right!

Adding treats to vacuuming time can work through this fear.  If the dog is really traumatized about the device, you may need to start with setting up the vacuum cleaner and giving the dog treats in the next room.  Over several sessions you can move the treat-giving closer, never faster than the dog's comfort level can handle.  Do the process with the vacuum off, next with the vacuum cleaner running, and finally with the vacuum cleaner moving.  While going through this program, put the dog in a different, safe place whenever you do actually vacuum so as not to undo all the good conditioning by scaring the dog again.

Principles of Working Through Fear 

If physical pain is determined to be the root cause of the behavior, make any indicated changes in medical treatment to keep the dog comfortable.  Don't assume that a problem brought under control at one point will never need further treatment.  This requires detective work!  Dogs have a survival instinct to hide their pain, because an animal showing weakness in the wild gets killed.  Look hard for possible physical problems, rather than expecting the dog to cry out in pain or otherwise "tell you." 

Assess the Problem

1. Do you know of an event that started the fear?

2. Is the thing the dog fears actually dangerous and/or likely to cause pain to the dog?  How are you going to keep your dog safe?

3. Are people or other animals being placed in danger by the dog's behavior and if so, how are you going to put a stop to that danger right now?

4. How can you protect the dog from experiencing this fear while you work through the behavior modification steps?

5. Is it necessary for the dog to cope with this situation, or could things reasonably be managed to simply keep the dog away from it from now on?

6. If you determine it's better to protect your dog from this situation rather than trying to treat the fear, give the dog time to get used to your new plan.  Chances are you'll be surprised to see how much happier your dog becomes.

To treat the fear, plan the steps for conditioning your dog gradually to the feared thing.

Plan how you are going to start at a DISTANCE from the feared thing, with it functioning at a low INTENSITY for periods of SHORT DURATION.  Plan how you will, over time, gradually reduce the distance, increase the intensity, and expose the dog to the feared thing for periods of longer duration.  Plan how you will increase one variable at a time.

Determine what things this dog finds rewarding.

For the greatest chance of success, you'll want to use as many of them as possible. Incentives include: food treats the dog likes, food treats the dog goes crazy for, regular meals, retrieving, games with you the dog enjoys playing, special toys reserved for special times, "happy-timing" the dog with a jolly attitude (using excited voice and body language to convey to the dog that is a happy thing), privileges such as a walk or ride in the car, and anything else THIS dog likes.

If you can't come up with anything your dog finds rewarding, developing these motivators is your first training goal!  One option is to break the dog's daily food into more, smaller meals.  Some or even all of the food can be fed by hand, depending on what works best for your conditioning program.

Discontinue all exposure of the dog to the feared thing.

Start your conditioning program at the distance, intensity and duration where your dog happily accepts rewards.  Advance very slowly toward your goal of having the dog comfortable with the feared thing so that the dog will be able to function happily around it in the future.  Be patient and take as long as needed to avoid pushing the dog too fast.  If you trigger the dog's fear during this process, that's a big setback, so keep the progress slow enough to avoid that.

Reward your dog at times the dog is showing confidence.

Avoid rewarding fearfulness.  Certainly don't punish the dog for acting fearful!  Just give the rewards at the moments when you see in your dog the state of mind that is your goal.

It Works - Even with Much Older Dogs!

Chances are good that at some point with every dog you'll have the opportunity help the dog overcome a fear.  Some dogs go through most of their lives with barely an apprehensive moment, and then get hit hard in old age when their bodies begin to fail and they don't know how to cope.  Now you know how to help your dog develop the ability to cope, at any age.


Condensed from “Fear: How to Help Your Dog Overcome It” Copyright 2004 - 2007 by Kathy Diamond Davis. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

Kathy Diamond Davis is the author of the book Therapy Dogs: Training Your Dog to Reach Others.